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Go is a multiparadigm, statically-typed, and compiled programming language designed by Google. It is similar to C, and if you’re a fan of C, this can be an easy language to pick up. Many developers have embraced this language because of its garbage collection, memory safety, and structural typing system.

Why use Go?

Before reviewing five top Go frameworks, what is Go truly used for? Aside from building general web applications, the language’s scope encompasses a wide range of use cases:

⇢ Command line application

⇢ Cloud-native development

⇢ Creating utilities and stand-alone libraries

⇢ Developing databases, such as CockroachDB

⇢ Game development

⇢ Development operations

If you’re looking to get started with Go, several frameworks are available that make development easier and faster. In this post, we’ll look at some of the most popular Golang frameworks and explain why they’re so powerful. So whether you’re looking to build a simple web or a more complex application, check out these frameworks!


Following is a list of the top 10 web frameworks in Golang ranked by popularity (based on stars on GitHub):

Expand ▶️ sections to read details about these frameworks

🔴 Gin

Git Repo - https://github.com/gin-gonic/gin

GoLang Gin is a popular web framework for building APIs and web applications in the Go programming language. It is known for its lightweight and fast performance, as well as its simplicity and ease of use. In this blog post, we’ll explore the key features and benefits of GoLang Gin, and discuss how to get started with the framework.

Features of GoLang Gin

GoLang Gin is a full-featured web framework that includes a number of useful features and tools for building web applications and APIs. Some of the key features of GoLang Gin include:

A lightweight and fast HTTP router Middleware support for adding custom functionality to request handling Automatic rendering of JSON and XML responses Built-in support for logging and error handling A flexible routing system for defining custom routes and handling requests Support for testing and debugging with the ability to mock requests and responses

Benefits of GoLang Gin

GoLang Gin has a number of benefits that make it a popular choice for web development in Go. Some of the key benefits of GoLang Gin include:

  1. Simplicity and ease of use: GoLang Gin has a simple and straightforward API, making it easy to get started with the framework.

  2. High performance: GoLang Gin is known for its lightweight and fast performance, which makes it a good choice for building high-performance web applications and APIs.

  3. Extensibility: GoLang Gin’s middleware system allows developers to easily add custom functionality to request handling, making it highly extensible.

Getting started with GoLang Gin

To get started with GoLang Gin, you’ll need to have Go installed on your machine. Once Go is installed, you can use the go get command to install the GoLang Gin package:

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go get -u github.com/gin-gonic/gin

Then, you can import the GoLang Gin package into your Go code and use it to create a new Gin router:

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import "github.com/gin-gonic/gin"

func main() {
    r := gin.New()
    r.GET("/", func(c *gin.Context) {
        c.JSON(200, gin.H{
            "message": "Hello, world!",
        })
    })
    r.Run() // listen and serve on 0.0.0.0:8080
}

This code creates a new Gin router and defines a simple route that returns a JSON response. To start the server, you can call the Run method on the router.

Conclusion

GoLang Gin is a powerful and easy-to-use web framework for building APIs and web applications in Go. Its lightweight and fast performance, as well as its simplicity and extensibility, make it a popular choice for Go developers. Whether you’re building a small API or a large web application, GoLang Gin can help you get the job done efficiently and effectively.


🟠 Beego

Git Repo- https://github.com/beego/beego

GoLang Beego is a full-featured web framework for building APIs and web applications in the Go programming language. It is known for its wide range of built-in features and tools, as well as its flexibility and scalability. In this blog post, we’ll explore the key features and benefits of GoLang Beego, and discuss how to get started with the framework.

Features of GoLang Beego

GoLang Beego is a feature-rich web framework that includes a number of tools and libraries for building web applications and APIs. Some of the key features of GoLang Beego include:

  1. A fast and lightweight HTTP router
  2. Support for multiple database drivers and ORMs
  3. Built-in support for logging and error handling
  4. A flexible routing system for defining custom routes and handling requests
  5. Support for middleware and plugins to add custom functionality
  6. Automatic rendering of JSON, XML, and HTML responses
  7. Built-in support for testing and debugging

Creating a new Beego project:

To create a new Beego project, you’ll need to have Go and the Beego toolkit installed on your machine. Once you have these tools installed, you can use the bee new command to create a new Beego project:

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bee new myproject

This will create a new directory called myproject with the basic structure and files needed for a Beego project.

Defining routes:

Beego uses a flexible routing system to define custom routes and handle requests. To define a route, you can use the Router function in your controller:

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func (c *MainController) Get() {
    c.Ctx.WriteString("Hello, world!")
}

func init() {
    beego.Router("/", &MainController{})
}

This code defines a route for the root path (/) and associates it with the MainController. When a request is made to the root path, the Get function of the MainController will be called and the string “Hello, world!” will be written to the response.

Using middleware:

Beego supports the use of middleware to add custom functionality to request handling. To use middleware, you can use the Use function in your controller:

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func (c *MainController) Get() {
    c.Data["json"] = map[string]string{"message": "Hello, world!"}
    c.ServeJSON()
}

func init() {
    beego.Router("/", &MainController{}, "get:Get")
    beego.InsertFilter("/*", beego.BeforeRouter, func(c *beego.Context) {
        // custom middleware logic goes here
    })
}

This code defines a route for the root path and associates it with the Get function of the MainController. It also defines a filter that will be executed before the router is called. In this case, the filter function is a simple function that does nothing, but you could add custom logic to the function to perform tasks such as authentication or rate limiting.

Rendering responses:

Beego includes built-in support for rendering various types of responses, including JSON, XML, and HTML. To render a JSON response, you can use the ServeJSON function in your controller:

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func (c *MainController) Get() {
    c.Data["json"] = map[string]string{"message": "Hello, world!"}
    c.ServeJSON()
}

This code sets the data to be rendered as JSON and calls the ServeJSON function to render the response. Beego will automatically set the appropriate content type header and encode the data as JSON before sending it to the client.


🟡 Go-Kit

Git Repo - https://github.com/go-kit/kit

Features of Go-Kit:

  • A lightweight, modular framework for building distributed systems
  • A set of libraries for building microservices, including libraries for service discovery, load balancing, and distributed tracing
  • A simple and flexible interface for defining services and endpoints
  • Support for middleware and interceptors to add custom functionality to request handling
  • Support for various transport layers, including HTTP, gRPC, and message queues

Code examples:

Go-Kit uses a concept called endpoints to define the methods available for a service. To define an endpoint, you can create a struct that defines the request and response types

Defining an endpoint:

To define an endpoint in Go-Kit, you can create a struct that defines the request and response types for the endpoint, as well as a function for handling the request:

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type SumRequest struct {
    A int `json:"a"`
    B int `json:"b"`
}

type SumResponse struct {
    Result int `json:"result"`
}

func makeSumEndpoint(svc Service) endpoint.Endpoint {
    return func(ctx context.Context, request interface{}) (interface{}, error) {
        req := request.(SumRequest)
        result, err := svc.Sum(ctx, req.A, req.B)
        if err != nil {
            return SumResponse{}, err
        }
        return SumResponse{Result: result}, nil
    }
}

This code defines a SumRequest struct that represents the request for the Sum endpoint, and a SumResponse struct that represents the response. It also defines a function called makeSumEndpoint that takes a service as an argument and returns an Endpoint function. The Endpoint function takes a context and a request object as arguments and returns a response object and an error. In this case, the Endpoint function calls the Sum method of the service and returns the result in the SumResponse struct.

Creating a server:

To create a server in Go-Kit, you can use the MakeHttpHandler function and pass it a map of endpoint functions:

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func main() {
    svc := &service{}

    endpoints := map[string]endpoint.Endpoint{
        "sum": makeSumEndpoint(svc),
    }

    handler := transport.MakeHttpHandler(endpoints)
    http.ListenAndServe(":8080", handler)
}

This code creates a new service, defines an endpoint for the Sum method, and creates an HTTP handler using the MakeHttpHandler function. It then starts an HTTP server and listens for requests on port 8080.


🟢 Echo

Git Repo - https://github.com/labstack/echo

Echo is a high performance, extensible, minimalist web framework for Go (Golang). It is designed to be fast, simple and flexible, and is an excellent choice for building web servers and APIs.

Here are some examples of how to use the Echo framework:

  1. Setting up a simple HTTP server:
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package main

import (
	"net/http"

	"github.com/labstack/echo/v4"
)

func main() {
	e := echo.New()

	e.GET("/", func(c echo.Context) error {
		return c.String(http.StatusOK, "Hello, World!")
	})

	e.Logger.Fatal(e.Start(":1323"))
}

This code sets up a new Echo instance and registers a route for the root path ("/") that returns a “Hello, World!” message. The server will listen on port 1323.

  1. Setting up middleware:
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package main

import (
	"net/http"

	"github.com/labstack/echo/v4"
	"github.com/labstack/echo/v4/middleware"
)

func main() {
	e := echo.New()

	// Middleware
	e.Use(middleware.Logger())
	e.Use(middleware.Recover())

	// Routes
	e.GET("/", func(c echo.Context) error {
		return c.String(http.StatusOK, "Hello, World!")
	})

	// Start server
	e.Logger.Fatal(e.Start(":1323"))
}

In this example, we’ve added two pieces of middleware to the Echo instance: a logger middleware that logs all requests, and a recovery middleware that recovers from any panics and returns a 500 Internal Server Error response.

  1. Setting up a route with path parameters:
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package main

import (
	"net/http"
	"strconv"

	"github.com/labstack/echo/v4"
)

func main() {
	e := echo.New()

	e.GET("/users/:id", func(c echo.Context) error {
		// Get user ID from path parameter
		id, _ := strconv.Atoi(c.Param("id"))

		// Look up user by ID
		// (assume user struct and database logic is implemented elsewhere)
		user, err := findUserByID(id)
		if err != nil {
			return c.String(http.StatusNotFound, "User not found")
		}

		// Return user information as JSON
		return c.JSON(http.StatusOK, user)
	})

	e.Logger.Fatal(e.Start(":1323"))
}

This example shows how to use path parameters in a route. The :id parameter in the route definition is used to capture the value of the id path parameter, which is then used to look up a user by ID. The user information is returned as a JSON object.


🔵 Fasthttp

Git Repo - https://github.com/valyala/fasthttp

Fasthttp is a fast HTTP implementation for GoLang that provides many benefits over the built-in net/http package. One of the main benefits is the faster performance and lower memory usage compared to net/http.

Here is an example of using Fasthttp to create a simple HTTP server:

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package main

import (
	"fmt"

	"github.com/valyala/fasthttp"
)

func main() {
	// Set up a request handler
	requestHandler := func(ctx *fasthttp.RequestCtx) {
		fmt.Fprintf(ctx, "Hello, world!")
	}

	// Start the server
	if err := fasthttp.ListenAndServe(":8080", requestHandler); err != nil {
		panic(err)
	}
}

This example creates a simple HTTP server that listens on port 8080 and responds with “Hello, world!” to any incoming requests.

Fasthttp also provides a variety of functions for making HTTP requests, such as Get, Post, Put, and Delete. Here is an example of using Fasthttp to make a GET request to an API:

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package main

import (
	"fmt"
	"log"

	"github.com/valyala/fasthttp"
)

func main() {
	// Set up the request
	req := fasthttp.AcquireRequest()
	defer fasthttp.ReleaseRequest(req)
	req.SetRequestURI("https://api.example.com/endpoint")
	req.Header.SetMethod("GET")

	// Set up the response
	resp := fasthttp.AcquireResponse()
	defer fasthttp.ReleaseResponse(resp)

	// Make the request
	client := &fasthttp.Client{}
	if err := client.Do(req, resp); err != nil {
		log.Fatal(err)
	}

	// Print the response body
	fmt.Println(string(resp.Body()))
}

This example makes a GET request to an API endpoint and prints the response body to the console. Fasthttp provides functions for setting headers, query parameters, and other options for the request and response.

Overall, Fasthttp provides a fast and efficient way to handle HTTP requests and responses in GoLang, making it a useful tool for building web applications and APIs.


🟣 Go-Fiber

Git Repo - https://github.com/gofiber/fiber

GoLang Fiber is a lightweight, fast, and efficient web framework that allows developers to create high-performance web applications quickly and easily. One of the key features of Fiber is its use of coroutines, which allow developers to write asynchronous code in a synchronous style, making it easier to write scalable and efficient applications.

One of the key benefits of using Fiber is its speed and efficiency. Fiber is optimized for high-concurrency environments, making it ideal for building high-performance web applications. It also has a lightweight design, which means it uses fewer resources and has a smaller memory footprint, making it ideal for deploying in resource-constrained environments.

Another key feature of Fiber is its support for middleware. Middleware allows developers to add functionality to their applications by defining functions that can be executed before or after the main request handler. This allows developers to easily add features such as logging, authentication, and more to their applications.

Here is an example of how to use middleware in a Fiber application:

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package main

import (
	"fmt"
	"github.com/gofiber/fiber"
)

func main() {
	app := fiber.New()

	app.Use(func(c *fiber.Ctx) {
		fmt.Println("Executing middleware before the main handler")
		c.Next()
		fmt.Println("Executing middleware after the main handler")
	})

	app.Get("/", func(c *fiber.Ctx) {
		c.Send("Hello, World!")
	})

	app.Listen(3000)
}

In this example, the middleware function is executed both before and after the main request handler, allowing the developer to add additional functionality to the application.

Overall, GoLang Fiber is a powerful and efficient web framework that allows developers to create high-performance web applications quickly and easily. Its use of coroutines and support for middleware make it an ideal choice for building scalable and efficient web applications.


⚫️ Gorilla

Github Link - https://github.com/orgs/gorilla

The GoLang Gorilla framework is a powerful tool for developing web applications in the Go programming language. It provides a number of features that make it easy to build and deploy web applications, including:

  1. Mux: The Mux package is a powerful HTTP request router and dispatcher that allows you to easily define routes and handle requests in your web application. For example, you can use the Mux package to define routes like “/users/:id” and then use the “:id” parameter to retrieve the specific user’s data from a database.

Code example :

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r := mux.NewRouter()
r.HandleFunc("/users/{id}", func(w http.ResponseWriter, r *http.Request) {
	vars := mux.Vars(r)
	userID := vars["id"]
	// Retrieve user data from database using userID
	// Render user data on the page
})
  1. Sessions: The Gorilla framework includes a package for managing user sessions, allowing you to store data about a user’s session and retrieve it when needed. This can be useful for storing things like user preferences or tracking a user’s progress through a web application.

Code example:

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store := sessions.NewCookieStore([]byte("secret-key"))
session, _ := store.Get(r, "session-name")

// Set a session value
session.Values["user_id"] = 123
session.Save(r, w)

// Get a session value
userID := session.Values["user_id"]
  1. Websockets: The Gorilla framework includes support for websockets, allowing you to easily build real-time, bi-directional communication applications. This can be useful for things like chat applications or real-time data visualization.

Code example:

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// Set up websocket connection
conn, err := upgrader.Upgrade(w, r, nil)
if err != nil {
	log.Println(err)
	return
}
defer conn.Close()

// Send message to client
err = conn.WriteMessage(websocket.TextMessage, []byte("Hello, client!"))
if err != nil {
	log.Println(err)
	return
}

// Receive message from client
_, msg, err := conn.ReadMessage()
if err != nil {
	log.Println(err)
	return
}
log.Printf("Received message: %s", msg)
  1. Secure Cookies: The Gorilla framework includes a package for creating secure cookies that are signed and encrypted for added security. This can be useful for storing sensitive data about a user’s session, like authentication tokens.

Code example:

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// Create a secure cookie
value := map[string]string{
	"username": "johndoe",
}
encoded, err := securecookie.Encode("cookie-name", value)
if err != nil {
	log.Println(err)
	return
}
cookie := &http.Cookie{
	Name:  "cookie-name",
	Value: encoded,
	Path:  "/",
}
http.SetCookie(w, cookie)

// Decode a secure cookie
cookie, err := r.Cookie("cookie-name")
if err != nil {
    if cookie == nil {
        log.Println("Cookie not found")
        return
    }
    value := make(map[string]string)
    if err = securecookie.Decode("cookie-name", cookie.Value, &value); err != nil {
    log.Println(err)
    return
}
username := value["username"]
log.Printf("Username: %s", username)

Overall, the GoLang Gorilla framework provides a number of useful features for developing web applications in Go, including routing, session management, websockets, and secure cookies. These features can be easily implemented with just a few lines of code, making it a powerful and convenient tool for building web applications in Go.


⚪️ Kratos

Github Repo - https://github.com/go-kratos/kratos

GoLang Kratos is a high-performance, lightweight and modular microservice framework that is designed to build cloud native applications with ease. It provides a range of features that make it an ideal choice for developers who want to build scalable, reliable and efficient applications.

Some of the key features of GoLang Kratos include:

  • High-performance: Kratos is designed to handle high levels of traffic with ease, making it ideal for building high-traffic applications such as e-commerce platforms, social media platforms, and gaming applications.

  • Lightweight: Kratos is a lightweight framework that is easy to install and deploy, making it ideal for developers who want to get started quickly.

  • Modular: Kratos is a modular framework that allows developers to easily add or remove features as needed. This makes it easy to customize applications to meet the specific needs of a project.

  • Microservice architecture: Kratos supports a microservice architecture, which allows developers to build applications that are composed of small, independent services that can be developed and deployed independently. This makes it easy to scale and maintain applications as they grow.

Here are some code examples that demonstrate the usability of GoLang Kratos:

  1. Example 1: Creating a simple Kratos application

In this example, we will create a simple Kratos application that serves a single route.

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package main

import (
	"github.com/baiy/kratos"
	"github.com/baiy/kratos/pkg/net/http/rest"
)

func main() {
	app := kratos.New()
	app.GET("/", func(ctx *rest.Context) {
		ctx.JSON(200, map[string]string{"message": "Hello, World!"})
	})
	app.Run()
}
  1. Example 2: Adding middleware to a Kratos application

In this example, we will add middleware to a Kratos application to log all incoming requests.

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package main

import (
	"github.com/baiy/kratos"
	"github.com/baiy/kratos/pkg/net/http/rest"
	"github.com/baiy/kratos/pkg/net/http/middleware"
)

func main() {
	app := kratos.New()
	app.Use(middleware.Logger())
	app.GET("/", func(ctx *rest.Context) {
		ctx.JSON(200, map[string]string{"message": "Hello, World!"})
	})
	app.Run()
}
  1. Example 3: Adding a database to a Kratos application

In this example, we will add a database to a Kratos application using the Kratos MySQL module.

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package main

import (
	"github.com/baiy/kratos"
	"github.com/baiy/kratos/pkg/net/http/rest"
	"github.com/baiy/kratos/pkg/database/mysql"
)

func main() {
	app := kratos.New()
	db, err := mysql.New(&mysql.Config{
    DSN: "root:password@tcp(localhost:3306)/testdb?parseTime=true",})
    if err != nil {
        panic(err)
    }
    app.Use(mysql.Inject(db))
    app.GET("/users", func(ctx *rest.Context) {
        var users []User
        if err := ctx.DB().Find(&users).Error; err != nil {
            ctx.Status(500).Error(err)
            return
        }
        ctx.JSON(200, users)
    })
    app.Run()
}

As demonstrated in above mentioned examples, GoLang Kratos is a powerful and easy-to-use framework that provides a range of features to make building cloud native applications a breeze.


🏀 Httprouter

Github Repo - https://github.com/julienschmidt/httprouter

The GoLang Httprouter framework is a lightweight and fast HTTP router that is designed to handle many requests concurrently. Some of its key features include:

  • Fast routing: Httprouter uses a radix tree data structure to store routes, which allows it to match routes in O(log n) time, making it faster than other routers that use a linear search.

  • Multiple methods: Httprouter allows you to handle different HTTP methods (GET, POST, PUT, etc.) for the same route by using the Method() function.

  • URL parameters: Httprouter allows you to extract URL parameters and pass them to your handler function using the Param() function.

  • Middleware: Httprouter supports the use of middleware, which are functions that are executed before your handler function. This allows you to perform tasks such as authentication or logging before the main handler is called.

  • NotFound and MethodNotAllowed handlers: Httprouter allows you to specify custom functions to handle requests that don’t match any routes or don’t support the requested method.

Here is an example of using Httprouter to handle a GET request to the root route:

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package main

import (
	"fmt"
	"net/http"
	
	"github.com/julienschmidt/httprouter"
)

func main() {
	router := httprouter.New()
	router.GET("/", func(w http.ResponseWriter, r *http.Request, _ httprouter.Params) {
		fmt.Fprint(w, "Welcome to the root route!")
	})
	
	http.ListenAndServe(":8080", router)
}

This example creates a new router and registers a handler function for the GET method on the root route. When a GET request is made to the root route, the handler function will be called and the response “Welcome to the root route!” will be sent to the client.


🟤 Revel

Github Repo - https://github.com/revel/revel

The GoLang Revel framework is a high-performance web framework that is designed for building modern web applications quickly and easily. It offers a number of features that make it particularly useful for developers looking to build fast, scalable web applications.

One of the main features of the GoLang Revel framework is its modular structure. This means that developers can easily add or remove modules as needed, making it easier to build and maintain web applications. Additionally, the framework includes a number of built-in modules that can be used to add functionality to your application, such as authentication, caching, and database support.

Another key feature of the GoLang Revel framework is its focus on performance. It includes a number of optimization techniques that help to ensure that your web applications run smoothly and efficiently, even under heavy load. This includes support for multiple concurrency models, such as goroutines and channels, as well as built-in support for caching and other performance-enhancing features.

Here is a code example of using the GoLang Revel framework to build a simple web application:

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package main

import (
	"github.com/revel/revel"
)

func main() {
	revel.Init("app", "dev")
	revel.INFO.Println("Application started")
	revel.Run()
}

This code initializes the Revel framework and sets the application and environment modes to “app” and “dev”, respectively. It then prints a message to the console indicating that the application has started, and finally starts the web server.

Overall, the GoLang Revel framework is a powerful and easy-to-use tool for building modern web applications. Its modular structure, focus on performance, and built-in support for a range of features make it a great choice for developers looking to build fast and scalable web applications.


🔘 Go-zero

Github Repo - https://github.com/zeromicro/go-zero

Go-zero is a high-performance, lightweight, and scalable Go framework that aims to make it easy for developers to build and deploy microservices.

Some key features of Go-zero include:

  1. Service discovery: Go-zero uses a registry service to discover and connect to other microservices. This allows for easy communication between services without the need for hardcoded IP addresses or URLs.

  2. Load balancing: Go-zero automatically distributes incoming requests across multiple instances of a microservice, ensuring that no one instance becomes overloaded.

  3. Circuit breaker: Go-zero includes a circuit breaker feature that helps to prevent cascading failures by automatically tripping and disabling requests to a failing service.

  4. Request tracing: Go-zero allows developers to easily trace the flow of requests through their microservices, making it easier to identify and troubleshoot issues.

Here is an example of how to use Go-zero to create a simple “hello world” microservice:

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package main

import (
	"github.com/go-zero/zero/service"
)

func main() {
	service.Start(func(svc service.Service) {
		svc.HandleFunc("/hello", func(c service.Context) {
			c.Write([]byte("hello world!"))
		})
	})
}

In this example, the service listens for incoming requests on the “/hello” endpoint and responds with a “hello world!” message. The service can then be easily deployed and scaled using Go-zero’s built-in registry and load balancing features.


🏐 Martini

Github Repo - https://github.com/go-martini/martini

The GoLang Martini framework is a popular choice for web development due to its simplicity and ease of use. Some key features of Martini include:

  1. Routing: Martini provides a simple and flexible routing system that allows developers to easily define routes and their corresponding handlers. For example, the following code snippet defines a route for the “/” path and sets a handler function that returns a “Hello, World!” message:
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package main

import "github.com/go-martini/martini"

func main() {
	m := martini.Classic()
	
	m.Get("/", func() string {
		return "Hello, World!"
	})

	m.Run()
}
  1. Middleware: Martini allows developers to define middleware functions that can be applied to specific routes or globally to all routes. These functions can be used to perform tasks such as authentication, logging, or error handling. For example, the following code snippet defines a middleware function that logs all incoming requests:
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package main

import (
	"github.com/go-martini/martini"
	"log"
)

func main() {
	m := martini.Classic()
	
	m.Use(func(c martini.Context) {
		log.Println("Incoming request:", c.Request)
	})
	
	m.Get("/", func() string {
		return "Hello, World!"
	})

	m.Run()
}
  1. Dependency Injection: Martini uses dependency injection to make it easy to manage dependencies within an application. This allows developers to easily inject dependencies into their handler functions without having to manually manage them. For example, the following code snippet defines a handler function that injects a database connection:
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package main

import (
	"database/sql"
	"github.com/go-martini/martini"
)

func main() {
	m := martini.Classic()
	
	m.Get("/", func(db *sql.DB) string {
		// use the injected database connection to perform a query
		return "Hello, World!"
	})

	m.Run()
}
  1. Static File Serving: Martini allows developers to easily serve static files from a specific directory. This is useful for serving assets such as images, CSS files, and JavaScript files. The following code snippet shows how to serve static files from the “public” directory:
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package main

import "github.com/go-martini/martini"

func main() {
	m := martini.Classic()
	
	// serve static files from the "public" directory
	m.Use(martini.Static("public"))
	
	m.Get("/", func() string {
		return "Hello, World!"
	})

	m.Run()
}
  1. Template Rendering: Martini provides integration with the Go html/template package, allowing developers to easily render HTML templates with dynamic data. The following code snippet shows how to render a template file named “index.tmpl” and pass in a data object:
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package main

import (
	"github.com/go-martini/martini"
	"net/http"
)

func main() {
	m := martini.Classic()
	
	m.Get("/", func(r *http.Request, w http.ResponseWriter) {
		data := map[string]string{
			"Name": "John",
			"Age": "30",
		}
		
		// render the "index.tmpl" template with the data object
		if err := tmpl.ExecuteTemplate(w, "index.tmpl", data); err != nil {
			http.Error(w, err.Error(), http.StatusInternalServerError)
		}
	})

	m.Run()
}
  1. JSON Response: Martini makes it easy to return JSON responses to clients. The following code snippet shows how to return a JSON object containing a list of users:
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package main

import (
	"encoding/json"
	"github.com/go-martini/martini"
	"net/http"
)

type User struct {
	ID int `json:"id"`
	Name string `json:"name"`
	Age int `json:"age"`
}

func main() {
	m := martini.Classic()
	
	m.Get("/users", func(w http.ResponseWriter) {
		// create a list of users
		users := []User{
			{ID: 1, Name: "John", Age: 30},
			{ID: 2, Name: "Jane", Age: 25},
		}
		
		// return the list of users as a JSON object
		json.NewEncoder(w).Encode(users)
	})

	m.Run()
}

Overall, the GoLang Martini framework provides a simple and easy-to-use interface for web development, making it a popular choice for many developers.


🎾 Chi

Git Repo - https://github.com/go-chi/chi

Chi is a lightweight, fast, and flexible router for the Go programming language. It is designed to be easy to use and provides a number of useful features for building web applications.

Some of the key features of Chi include:

  1. Middleware support: Chi allows you to easily add middleware functions to your routes, which can be used to perform tasks such as logging, authentication, or error handling.

  2. URL parameter parsing: Chi automatically parses and exposes URL parameters to your routes, making it easy to access them in your code.

  3. Subrouters: Chi allows you to create subrouters, which allow you to group related routes together and apply middleware to them all at once.

  4. ServeMux compatibility: Chi is compatible with the built-in ServeMux, allowing you to easily integrate it into your existing Go web applications.

Here is an example of how you might use Chi to create a simple web server in Go:

They rank among the best Google Go language frameworks for assisting you as you go on with the development of your website or mobile application. Make sure you are familiar with the requirements of the project before selecting the best option from the list.

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package main

import (
	"fmt"
	"net/http"

	"github.com/go-chi/chi"
)

func main() {
	r := chi.NewRouter()

	r.Get("/", func(w http.ResponseWriter, r *http.Request) {
		fmt.Fprintf(w, "Welcome to my website!")
	})

	r.Get("/users/{userID}", func(w http.ResponseWriter, r *http.Request) {
		userID := chi.URLParam(r, "userID")
		fmt.Fprintf(w, "You are viewing user %s", userID)
	})

	http.ListenAndServe(":8080", r)
}

In this example, we create a new router using the chi.NewRouter() function, and then define two routes using the Get() method. The first route simply displays a welcome message, while the second route displays a message with the userID parameter passed in the URL. Chi automatically parses and exposes this parameter, making it easy to access in our code.

We then start the server using the ListenAndServe() function, passing in our router as the handler. This allows us to easily serve multiple routes and apply middleware to them all at once.


🧏🏼‍♂️ Summary

Few key factors to consider when choosing a Go framework:

  • Ease of use: Look for a framework that is easy to learn and use, with clear documentation and examples.

  • Performance: Go is known for its speed, so choose a framework that is optimized for performance.

  • Community support: Look for a framework that has a strong and active community, as this can be a good indicator of its reliability and long-term viability.

  • Feature set: Consider the features that you need in a framework, such as routing, middleware support, and database integration.

  • Compatibility: If you are integrating a new framework into an existing Go project, make sure it is compatible with your existing codebase.

It can also be helpful to try out a few different frameworks and see which one works best for your needs. Many Go developers recommend trying out the built-in ServeMux and then moving on to more fully-featured frameworks such as Chi, Echo, or Gin if needed.